Programming Languages

What programming language should I learn, a link I found on Twitter (like most of the other things I seem to find, nowadays) is a nice list and a good map for some one who is learning languages and looking for experimenting more.

I think for each language we can add a set of additional reasons – for example:

php – any work on mediawiki, drupal, joomla etc.
c# – any work on web parts, dotnet components, silverlight RIA
python – any work on django, nltk, machine learning, Plone, zope

In addition, I would add these languages. They are on my list to play around with and build a few prototypes (not sure when I get to them, though)

Boo – A python inspired language for writing DSLs (domain specific languages)
L Sharp or Lisp or Scheme – A list based language for learning programming
Squeak – A small talk based language for building delightful interactive applications
Berkeley Logo – For simulations, nothing beats this lisp inspired language
Prolog – for building logic programs and expert systems (though expert systems are fading away with machine learning based languages)
Haskell – Seems to be catching fire and may be one of the preferred languages for building multi-core apps
Erlang – Another language for building highly robust, scalable, multi-core apps
AIML – Artificial Intelligence Markup Language for buidling chat bots (even has a python AIML engine). Currently working with a student to build a chatbot for SugarCRM
SPARQL – A semantic web query language (easy if you already know SQL)
RDF and OWL – Not really languages in the conventional sense but I consider them as data languages

After writing all this, I decided to put this in my blog since it is worth remembering and updating them.

When I watch some videos on Lisp/Scheme, I understand why Lispers are so religious about their language. I have not seen more efficient/concise ways of solving problems or clarity of concepts.